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Mediated citizenship: opportunities, conditions and practices in young people´s everyday life


The broad question of how the media impact on the fostering of civically and politically engaged citizens is the object of much research. Traditionally it has focused mainly on news and other informational media, with information acquisition perceived to be the central mechanism of engagement.

Recent research within the cultural studies strand of political communication has aimed to transcend the preponderant focus on news and information acquisition. This, however, largely remains a theoretical or case-study based project. In our view, the research field is in need of systematic empirical studies that explore how these mechanisms work in everyday-life contexts.

This project investigates practices of media consumption from the point of view of the everyday life of young adults (17-18 year-olds). Using a combination of qualitative data gathering techniques (observations, interviews and diaries) it employs a novel research design that targets a variety of different activities and settings that are believed to be pertinent with respect to young people´s societal and political engagement (media consumption, school, peer relations and family relations). Rather than evaluating the citizenship practices of young people in only one context or activity in isolation (e.g. internet use or news consumption), this research will be able to explore how different everyday-life contexts relate to each other with respect to media consumption and citizenship practices.

Project leader: Mats Ekström
Other researchers/participants: Malin Svenningson (JMG, The University of Gothenburg)
Financed by the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet)

Page Manager: Mats Ekström|Last update: 2/19/2013
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